CROSS: You Can Belly Dance If You Want To

Actress Sienna Miller plays a wife who bonds with immigrant, Mona (Golshifteh Farahani) over belly dance in the 2013 buddy film, Just Like A Woman Photo: Just Like A Woman

Photo: Just Like A Woman

Rants an entity called Randa Jarrar Why I can’t stand white belly dancers over at Salon.com:

Women I have confronted about this have said, “But I have been dancing for 15 years! This is something I have built a huge community on.” These women are more interested in their investment in belly dancing than in questioning and examining how their appropriation of the art causes others harm. To them, I can only say, I’m sure there are people who have been unwittingly racist for 15 years. It’s not too late. Find another form of self-expression. Make sure you’re not appropriating someone else’s.

When I have argued, online and in person, with white women belly dancers, they have assured me that they learned to dance from Arab women and brown women. This is supposed to make the transaction OK. Instead, I point out that all this means is that it is perfectly all right with these teachers that their financial well-being is based on self-exploitation. As a follow-up, white belly dancers then focus on the sisterly and community aspect of belly dance. They claim that the true exploiter of belly dancing is Hollywood, and the Egyptian film industry, which helped take belly dancing out of women’s homes and placed it directly under the male gaze. Here, the argument white belly dancers try to make ignores the long history of white women’s appropriation of Eastern dancing and becomes that this, the learning and performance of belly dance, is not about race and appropriation, but about gender and resisting the patriarchy and how all of us belly dancing together is a giant middle finger to men and their male gaze-y ways.

But, here’s the thing. Arab women are not vessels for white women to pour themselves and lose themselves in; we are not bangles or eyeliner or tiny bells on hips. We are human beings. This dance form is originally ours, and does not exist so that white women can have a better sense of community; can gain a deeper sense of sisterhood with each other; can reclaim their bodies; can celebrate their sexualities; can perform for the female gaze. Just because a white woman doesn’t profit from her performance doesn’t mean she’s not appropriating a culture. And, ultimately, the question is this: Why does a white woman’s sisterhood, her self-reclamation, her celebration, have to happen on Arab women’s backs?

Ayn Rand answered this issue several decades ago in her article “Racism”:

Modern racists attempt to prove the superiority or inferiority of a given race by the historical achievements of some of its members. The frequent historical spectacle of a great innovator who, in his lifetime, is jeered, denounced, obstructed, persecuted by his countrymen, and then, a few years after his death, is enshrined in a national monument and hailed as a proof of the greatness of the German (or French or Italian or Cambodian) race—is as revolting a spectacle of collectivist expropriation, perpetrated by racists, as any expropriation of material wealth perpetrated by communists.

Just as there is no such thing as a collective or racial mind, so there is no such thing as a collective or racial achievement. There are only individual minds and individual achievements—and a culture is not the anonymous product of undifferentiated masses, but the sum of the intellectual achievements of individual men.

And in her essay “Global Balkanization”:

“The acceptance of the achievements of an individual by other individuals does not represent ‘ethnicity': it represents a cultural division of labor in a free market; it represents a conscious, individual choice on the part of all the men involved; the achievements may be scientific or technological or industrial or intellectual or esthetic—and the sum of such accepted achievements constitutes a free, civilized nation’s culture. Tradition has nothing to do with it; tradition is being challenged and blasted daily in a free, civilized society: its citizens accept ideas and products because they are true and/or good—not because they are old nor because their ancestors accepted them. In such a society, concretes change, but what remains immutable—by individual conviction, not by tradition—are those philosophical principles which correspond to reality, i.e., which are true.” [“Global Balkanization,” - The Voice of Reason, 119]

Like medicine, the Waltz, or tennis, there is nothing inherent in belly dancing that makes it the exclusive attribute of some race or so-called “ethnicity.” To claim so, is in fact racism of the highest order.

People should be free to choose and enjoy the achievements that they regard as good, regardless of ones race, sex, ancestry or heritage. This freedom of choice in principle is the basis of any rational culture, as opposed to the limiting racist one that Randa Jarrar subscribes to.

  • Squid Hunt

    I can’t even begin to describe the screaming anger I felt at reading that article. I’ve never seen so much arrogant smugness in my life. “OUR” dance? Why not give back the things that belong to white people, like blogging and freedom of speech and womens’ lib. Those belong to us. I want them back. How dare you abuse white men by stealing our culture.

    • Swede_P

      I couldn’t have put it any better myself.